PDA

View Full Version : Heating for fermentation fridge



PearlJam
11th August 2017, 18:29
I have a fermentation fridge with a temp controller, but have always had cooling only.

Since then I got a freeloader that started squatting in my garage who was also responsible that I now have to rewire the fridge (after putting out some rattex)

So I thought this is a good time to do some heating as well. What recommendations are there that can run off 12v to heat?

CraftyZA
12th August 2017, 07:01
12v might not be enough. Most reptile heating pads runs of 220 for 7, 12 or 14 watts.

that guy al
12th August 2017, 07:46
why only 12v?

PearlJam
12th August 2017, 08:49
Apparently the temp controller pushes out 12v, I will just check again with my BIL if I understood him correctly as he will be doing the wiring and knows the controller

PearlJam
12th August 2017, 10:19
The thermostat work with DC which is the reason it has to be 12v

AtronSeige
13th August 2017, 08:14
I am not sure about voltage, but quite a few people add light(s) to their fermentation chambers to do heating. I have seen normal lights, as well as red ones used in reptile enclosures.

Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk

Bigfoot
14th August 2017, 08:21
Don`t spend money on heating pads,
just use a bedside lamp with one of those energy saving bulbs (florescent type) put it in the fridge and leave on permanently.
The lamp heats just enough to warm the inside of your fridge slowly and if it comes to were your temp controll kicks in it wil start the fridge up.
I did this with one of those cheap R70 temp controlls and it stays at a constant 18 deg comes summer or winter. https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20170814/f3a3dc8179d8bf6af8be69b678cfbb17.jpg

Cheers

AtronSeige
14th August 2017, 08:42
Just a warning regarding using lights: your beer can skunk if it is in contact with light. Make sure your fermenter is blocked from light.

Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk

69degrees
14th August 2017, 09:15
I use a large flourescent bulb. The biggest one I could find. It's subtle enough to gradually manage the temperature. I have clear fermenters, so the bulb is therefore put inside an empty coffee can. A nice big Ricoffy can works well. I punched a hole on the bottom of the can to pull the power cord through, and it then stands on the 'opening' end to block light from exiting. The whole can starts to heat up, and very little light exits from the can.

Bigfoot
14th August 2017, 09:36
Just a warning regarding using lights: your beer can skunk if it is in contact with light. Make sure your fermenter is blocked from light.

Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk

Please elaborate on what is it when beer skunk and what happens to the beer , taste and smell.

Ps I never had off flavors , but then again I'm not a brewmaster

Thank you.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

AtronSeige
14th August 2017, 11:12
Please elaborate on what is it when beer skunk and what happens to the beer , taste and smell.

"Skunky or cat-musk aromas in beer are caused by photochemical reactions of the isomerized hop compounds. The wavelengths of light that cause the skunky smell are the blue wavelengths and the ultraviolet. Brown glass bottles effectively screen out these wavelengths, but green bottles do not. Skunkiness will result in beers if the beer is left in direct sunlight or stored under fluorescent lights as in supermarkets. In beers which use pre-isomerized hop extract and very little flavoring hop additions, the beer will be fairly immune to damage from ultraviolet light." John Palmer http://howtobrew.com/book/section-4/is-my-beer-ruined/common-off-flavors

If your fermenter is clear glass, then you may have this problem. I cover my fermenters in black t-shirts, fastened around the neck with a cable-tie, to ensure as little light touch my beer as possible.

How to make your own skunked beer - go to your local super market and look for beer in green bottles. Heineken used to work really well. Buy at least two bottles. Take the ones that are in the back. Go home, place the one in the fridge, and the outside in a nice, sunny space. Leave it there for a few hours, then take put it in the fridge with the other beer and allow to cool. When it has cooled enough, you can open both bottles and pour them into glasses. You should have a noticeable aroma difference. I recommend opening the beers outside, as the aroma may be very strong and may make your wife very angry. :)

You can also take a "craft" beer that uses a good amount of hops, pour it into a clear glass (just pour 100 to 200 ml, no use in ruining a full beer) and cover the glass with something like a saucer to stop any bugs from climbing in. Leave glass in sunny space, then lift the saucer.

I don't think there are many brewmasters on this forum, mostly just a bunch of beer freaks!

jakeslouw
14th August 2017, 11:38
"Skunky or cat-musk aromas"

very similar to LPG gas which uses some mercaptan to alert users to gas leaks

Bigfoot
14th August 2017, 12:31
"Skunky or cat-musk aromas in beer are caused by photochemical reactions of the isomerized hop compounds. The wavelengths of light that cause the skunky smell are the blue wavelengths and the ultraviolet. Brown glass bottles effectively screen out these wavelengths, but green bottles do not. Skunkiness will result in beers if the beer is left in direct sunlight or stored under fluorescent lights as in supermarkets. In beers which use pre-isomerized hop extract and very little flavoring hop additions, the beer will be fairly immune to damage from ultraviolet light." John Palmer http://howtobrew.com/book/section-4/is-my-beer-ruined/common-off-flavors

If your fermenter is clear glass, then you may have this problem. I cover my fermenters in black t-shirts, fastened around the neck with a cable-tie, to ensure as little light touch my beer as possible.

How to make your own skunked beer - go to your local super market and look for beer in green bottles. Heineken used to work really well. Buy at least two bottles. Take the ones that are in the back. Go home, place the one in the fridge, and the outside in a nice, sunny space. Leave it there for a few hours, then take put it in the fridge with the other beer and allow to cool. When it has cooled enough, you can open both bottles and pour them into glasses. You should have a noticeable aroma difference. I recommend opening the beers outside, as the aroma may be very strong and may make your wife very angry. :)

You can also take a "craft" beer that uses a good amount of hops, pour it into a clear glass (just pour 100 to 200 ml, no use in ruining a full beer) and cover the glass with something like a saucer to stop any bugs from climbing in. Leave glass in sunny space, then lift the saucer.

I don't think there are many brewmasters on this forum, mostly just a bunch of beer freaks!

Thank you
Pretty much a answer I would expect from a brewmaster


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

PearlJam
15th August 2017, 07:09
Thanks guys. I thought I would stay for now on the cooling only ito the wiring. Next winter I could look at external heating like the light option as it is only an issue during winter.

that guy al
15th August 2017, 12:13
out of interest, what temp controller are you using?

robcass
15th August 2017, 12:38
The thermostat work with DC which is the reason it has to be 12v

You can use the controller to activate a relay, which can control 220V to use a conventional lamp or heating pad etc.

PearlJam
16th August 2017, 07:10
out of interest, what temp controller are you using?

It is a Dixell XR50CX


You can use the controller to activate a relay, which can control 220V to use a conventional lamp or heating pad etc.

Thanks for the tip. I will google a bit to see how that is done