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brewengineers
27th March 2014, 17:05
Hi Home Brewers,

We are a new company specializing in the design and manufacturing of home brewing equipment. Our equipment is unique and can be tailored to your needs. Visit our website (http://www.brewengineers.co.za) for details of all our equipment and keep an eye out because we are constantly coming up with new products.

Below are a few images of our current products (some of the pics are straight from our workshop, haven't had time to pretty them up yet):

320321322


Happy Brewing,
The Brew Engineers Team

AtronSeige
27th March 2014, 17:11
Ooooooohhhh! Pretty!

pretorjn
28th March 2014, 07:59
One day when I'm an adult I NEED one of these SS brewpots

CapeTownBrew
28th March 2014, 08:07
Excuse me while I mop up the drool! Looks like I will be saving up!

pretorjn
21st April 2014, 22:28
Still pondering one of these pots. Two questions:
Will a 25l pot be enough for 20l fermenter batches? Currently I am using two huge alu pots and my losses are a lot due to the large surface area for evaporation, so I have to start out a lot bigger to end up at 18-20l
Are these SS pots useable on induction tops? I see the website states it has a triclad bottom

SimonB
22nd April 2014, 02:27
Pretorjn, no, a 25l pot is not big enough for 20l final volume. For a full volume 60 minute boil, you're going to lose about 15-20%. So , you'll need to start off with around, 23-25l at least, not taking into account trub losses. Then you have to take into account the headspace needed to prevent boil over.

The general rule is you need a pot twice the size of your final fermenter volume, and yes they can be used on an induction cooker

AtronSeige
22nd April 2014, 07:53
Something that a lot of homebrewers do is they "boil the snot out of their wort" (Jamil Zainasheff). This causes a lot of excess loss to evaporation. I boil in a 50 litre alu casserole pot and I get 13% loss. Boiling in a windy area also increases evaporation.

I have never worked with induction (or even seen it working) but I am very interested. Please keep up posted.

If you are looking for catering equipment (instead of "brewing" equipment) then places like Core Catering are very well priced. If you find something specific at a catering store let me know and I will see if I can get you some discount. :P My brother and his girlfriend are chefs and thus have access to places and prices that us mere mortals will never enjoy.

One last thing: You can make any size batch with any sized pot, but there will be complications. If you want to do an "extract, partial boil" then you can boil 12 litres with the extract and hops, then add that to the (boiled) remained of the batch (+- 8 litres) and you have a putt 18 litres. You can boil half of your wort with half the hops, then boil the other half with the remaining hops. So, breaking it up into steps will work, but it will add a LOT of time to your brewday, unless you have many burners and pots!

Cheers

MongooseMan
22nd April 2014, 08:24
+1 on the partial boil. I'm making a 50l batch next week in my 36l pot by getting my usual 28l (super concentrated) and "watering it down" with 22l of spring water. Some folk on the internet reckon you don't even need to boil the topup water, but I probably will, just to be safe.

Long story short, if you currently have the smaller pot, give it a go. Don't spend money you don't have to, right away (although, trust me, brewing is a bug that attaches itself right onto your credit card and doesn't let go :))
[goes back to browsing electronics on eBay....]

pretorjn
22nd April 2014, 08:39
Thanks guys

I currently have a 21l and a 12l aluminium pot, so I split the boil in two pots and divide the hops proportionally. Problem is the 21l is just too small for two plates and just too big for one to keep a decent boil. So my gasburner with three heads works fine for this, and the beer is pretty drinkable up to now. But the additional surface area must have a huge impact on evaporation and obviously I would like to end up with more beer. That being said, I have never calculated my losses but know that I add about 33l water to the mash and then end up with about 17l in the fermenter.
;)


Other thing is, we are redoing the kitchen and will have a 4 plate induction with two plate gas on the side. I can carry on as now with the larger pot on the portable gasburner, but at some stage I would like to upgrade to SS that I can use on the induction hobs due to the faster boil. I guess maybe I would just like some new toys at some stage
:o

One more question, is having a tap on the boil vessel so much better than just using a syphon to drain the boiled wort?

AtronSeige
22nd April 2014, 09:42
(snip) brewing is a bug that attaches itself right onto your credit card and doesn't let go :))

Ha! I am too smart for that! My cc was maxed out before I started brewing! :P

AtronSeige
22nd April 2014, 09:58
One more question, is having a tap on the boil vessel so much better than just using a syphon to drain the boiled wort?

YES!NO!MAYBE!

Remember, in brewing there are three correct answers for every Yes/No question. :P

Taps:
Pros: A tap makes it easier to collect the wort and transfer to your kettle (and then the fermenter). Taps can be installed at an angle to assist with whirlpooling. Taps look professional. Taps allow you to calculate your trub loss. almost "automatic".
Cons: Taps tend to be around groin height on the brewing structures. Taps have a lot more parts that need to be cleaned. Relatively expensive. Specially designed pots. Expert welding is recommended.

Syphon (what I use):
Pros: A lot less cleaning.
Cons:Hoses however get warm and if you are unprepared for this obvious fact you have to find a solution quickly! It is a manual method. Potential for boiling wort in mouth if you are not paying attention. If you do not pay attention you can suck in a LOT of trub!

Auto-syphon (what I also use): ONLY ON THE COLD SIDE!!!
Pros: No sucking of wort/beer. Has a little jobbie that helps that the trub is not sucked in. If you have an immersion chiller you can use the auto-syphon to get wort from kettle to fermenter.
Cons: 3 more parts to clean and sanitize. Can only be used on the sold side.

Pouring from one to the other (I used to do this):
Pros: Cheap!
Cons: Pouring 30 litres of hot wort is extremely dangerous! You may need assistance with this. (Possible) Hot Wort Aeration.

Ferment in the kettle (I have not tried this!)
Pros: Nothing to move around, just boil, chill and pitch! Super Cheap!
Cons: I am sure that your beer should not be on the trub that long.
Mmmm... if you can do this IN a keg, then you can just carbonate and go! This sounds like an experiment!

Cheers

Brewster
22nd April 2014, 10:27
YES!NO!MAYBE!

Remember, in brewing there are three correct answers for every Yes/No question. :P

Taps:
Pros: A tap makes it easier to collect the wort and transfer to your kettle (and then the fermenter). Taps can be installed at an angle to assist with whirlpooling. Taps look professional. Taps allow you to calculate your trub loss. almost "automatic".
Cons: Taps tend to be around groin height on the brewing structures. Taps have a lot more parts that need to be cleaned. Relatively expensive. Specially designed pots. Expert welding is recommended.

Syphon (what I use):
Pros: A lot less cleaning.
Cons:Hoses however get warm and if you are unprepared for this obvious fact you have to find a solution quickly! It is a manual method. Potential for boiling wort in mouth if you are not paying attention. If you do not pay attention you can suck in a LOT of trub!

Auto-syphon (what I also use): ONLY ON THE COLD SIDE!!!
Pros: No sucking of wort/beer. Has a little jobbie that helps that the trub is not sucked in. If you have an immersion chiller you can use the auto-syphon to get wort from kettle to fermenter.
Cons: 3 more parts to clean and sanitize. Can only be used on the sold side.

Pouring from one to the other (I used to do this):
Pros: Cheap!
Cons: Pouring 30 litres of hot wort is extremely dangerous! You may need assistance with this. (Possible) Hot Wort Aeration.

Ferment in the kettle (I have not tried this!)
Pros: Nothing to move around, just boil, chill and pitch! Super Cheap!
Cons: I am sure that your beer should not be on the trub that long.
Mmmm... if you can do this IN a keg, then you can just carbonate and go! This sounds like an experiment!

Cheers

I use a stainless tap with a 90 degree bend using a stainless braided hose for filter. After whirlpooling and a 15 minute wait (I force myself because at this point I just want to fill the fermenter) the wort runs clear. Never disassembled the tap because it is on the boil side and the boil temperature kills off all bugs. I just rinse with boiling water before filling with wort. I use a 70l aluminium pot for a 50l batch. One observation is that I drilled the hole too low. Another 10mm higher would result in just that little bit more clearance above the trub.

SimonB
22nd April 2014, 10:28
I didn't mention partial multivessel boils because it's too hit and miss in my mind. But if you have the equipment already, then fine, but if you are starting a new setup then it makes sense to go biggest you can afford.

As regards taps, it depends on what you want to do, and the method of holding the trub back. In my case the tap is essential.