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Andreas
23rd January 2020, 20:26
Hi,

I would like to find out, who makes wine?
Do you make with fresh fruit or kits?
Which kits would you recommend?

groenspookasem
23rd January 2020, 21:13
I'm attempting a sake soon, I have some koji and need some short grain rice.

Brewcraft has wine kits, although going natural would be my plan of attack. I dont think it's too difficult, but have zero experience, so talking out my ass here

Sent from my SM-N970F using Tapatalk

Toxxyc
24th January 2020, 06:17
I make mead, which is pretty much honey wine. Would love a good wine sometime. I would recommend fresh fruit or kits, not from store-bought juice or concentrate unless you can get really good quality juice with no preservatives or additives. Wine is easier and faster than beer on brew day, but I believe it needs a bit more TLC to get right. It also needs a bit of time, so give it just that.

JIGSAW
24th January 2020, 07:44
The wine "kits" that the LHBS sold in SA was not really a success and that is also why places like Beerlab are longer stocking them.

The wine kits that you would find in countries like Canada is a complete different story and their stuff is top-notch ... you actually get a bladder of 25L of pure juice to work with. It also works out very cheap to make wine in Canada, whereas the stuff here was way overpriced and it was actually cheaper to buy a bottle in-store than to make your own.

Im not sure who still stocks wine kits, but if its 'concentrated gooo' that you must dilute with water, STAY AWAY.! :p

The Flying Brew
24th January 2020, 07:47
Hi Andreas,I started making wine last year on the side. I buy the brewcraft kits from Vintners. From what I've found they are the best available in SA.My first wine was a Riesling which came out pretty good. It's very easy. Don't expect a R400 bottle of wine though. Probably in the R80-R120 per bottle price range. Your hard costs including bottles will be around R40. I started primary fermentation of a Merlot this week and all-in-all I think it only took an hour to prep equipment and throw everything together. I think homebrewers (beer) have an advantage to most home winemakers as we generally have temp control which is often overlooked in that segment. Wine yeast is a lot less fragile than beer yeast so don't overthink it. I buy a fresh pack of yeast from brewcraft and use it in tandem with the EC-1118 you usually get with the kit. It's a small cost for insurance but from what I've read online, all the winemakers are happy using the yeast from their kits even if it wasn't stored in ideal conditions. Let me know if you have any other questions, I'll answer if I can. winemakingtalk.com is probably the best forum out there and if you want to know a bit more of viticulture and winemaking in general, I'd recommend you listen to the https://www.insidewinemaking.com/ podcast. If you want to go the route of making wine with grapes, the issue is mainly that harvest only comes around once a year. One of the biggest parts of the winemaking process is the way in which the grapes are cultivated, which you will have no control over. Getting your hands on high quality grapes that are also not picked too early or too late will depend on whether you have contacts in the industry, where you are located or your networking skills. I'm currently trying to find grapes for the harvest coming up in February/March but haven't been able to find a source yet and also need to figure out how to get the grapes up to Gauteng efficiently. Very difficult considering the small quantity (200kg) I'm looking for. Still trying to figure this part out. Would help if there are other people in Gauteng doing the same but haven't yet found any and there's not really a Winemaking club up here either. Once you have grapes, the way in which you make the wine very much depends on what you are making.

Andreas
24th January 2020, 13:06
I'm attempting a sake soon, I have some koji and need some short grain rice.

Brewcraft has wine kits, although going natural would be my plan of attack. I dont think it's too difficult, but have zero experience, so talking out my ass here

Sent from my SM-N970F using Tapatalk

Sake should be very interesting. Please post on how it went.

Andreas
24th January 2020, 13:07
I make mead, which is pretty much honey wine. Would love a good wine sometime. I would recommend fresh fruit or kits, not from store-bought juice or concentrate unless you can get really good quality juice with no preservatives or additives. Wine is easier and faster than beer on brew day, but I believe it needs a bit more TLC to get right. It also needs a bit of time, so give it just that.

Nice, I've wanted to start brewing mead for a while too. Curently the price of honey is making me a bit hesitant to try. What does an average mead taste like?

Andreas
24th January 2020, 13:10
Hi Andreas,I started making wine last year on the side. I buy the brewcraft kits from Vintners. From what I've found they are the best available in SA.My first wine was a Riesling which came out pretty good. It's very easy. Don't expect a R400 bottle of wine though. Probably in the R80-R120 per bottle price range. Your hard costs including bottles will be around R40. I started primary fermentation of a Merlot this week and all-in-all I think it only took an hour to prep equipment and throw everything together. I think homebrewers (beer) have an advantage to most home winemakers as we generally have temp control which is often overlooked in that segment. Wine yeast is a lot less fragile than beer yeast so don't overthink it. I buy a fresh pack of yeast from brewcraft and use it in tandem with the EC-1118 you usually get with the kit. It's a small cost for insurance but from what I've read online, all the winemakers are happy using the yeast from their kits even if it wasn't stored in ideal conditions. Let me know if you have any other questions, I'll answer if I can. winemakingtalk.com is probably the best forum out there and if you want to know a bit more of viticulture and winemaking in general, I'd recommend you listen to the https://www.insidewinemaking.com/ podcast. If you want to go the route of making wine with grapes, the issue is mainly that harvest only comes around once a year. One of the biggest parts of the winemaking process is the way in which the grapes are cultivated, which you will have no control over. Getting your hands on high quality grapes that are also not picked too early or too late will depend on whether you have contacts in the industry, where you are located or your networking skills. I'm currently trying to find grapes for the harvest coming up in February/March but haven't been able to find a source yet and also need to figure out how to get the grapes up to Gauteng efficiently. Very difficult considering the small quantity (200kg) I'm looking for. Still trying to figure this part out. Would help if there are other people in Gauteng doing the same but haven't yet found any and there's not really a Winemaking club up here either. Once you have grapes, the way in which you make the wine very much depends on what you are making.

Thanks for the reply. I made a few 4 liter batches (2) from catawba grapes when I lived in Barberton and the moved to Boshof in the Free State, which killed my access to most grapes. I might just order a kit from brewcraft, I was hesitant as I couldn't ask anyone how they tasted.

Toxxyc
27th January 2020, 10:42
Nice, I've wanted to start brewing mead for a while too. Curently the price of honey is making me a bit hesitant to try. What does an average mead taste like?
A basic traditional tastes like a fruity, off-dry white wine.

JimSwift
18th June 2020, 09:25
Hi! I make wine from fresh grapes. In order to ensure that the grapes have the wild yeast needed for fermentation, it is desirable to harvest berries in sunny dry weather. It shouldn't rain for at least two or three days before that.Only ripe fruit is suitable for winemaking. Too much acid is present in immature grapes, and acetic fermentation begins in overripe berries, which can later spoil the whole must (squeezed juice). I also advise against taking fallen grapes, which makes grape wine have an unpleasant taste of the earth. The ripped berries have to be processed within two days.

Toxxyc
18th June 2020, 09:57
I would LOVE to get my hands on a few kilos of grapes, to be honest. Mead is easy now, so now I want to try a good wine!

JimSwift
18th June 2020, 13:55
Come to Ukraine with us. We'll have a rich harvest in September))