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  • Rum

    Rum. That sweet goodness that's made from the simplest of ingredients - molasses and sugar. I currently have 7 litres of low wines, probably at around 40% ABV, and have a 50 litre wash that's finishing up fermenting now. I used a blend of molasses and brown sugar, and pitched in some yeast nutrients followed by two packets of NCP High Foaming Brewing Yeast, that cheap-ass yellow packet.

    That yeast really impressed me. I pitched the lot on Wednesday last week, and when I took a reading yesterday it already ate through most of the sugar. I started the wash at 1.114 OG, and it was down to 1.032 yesterday afternoon. I'll be distilling the lot tomorrow, probably. I'll also be buying a bulk box of that yeast from Makro. Cheap as chips, and now I know it can do at LEAST 10% ABV.

  • #2
    I have done a couple of Rum Runs in my setup, but have mostly used the purple Anchor yeast to date. Still comes through with a nice molasses nose. Your wash sounds similar to mine consisting of molasses, brown sugar and some DAP nutrient. On the last run, I used Distillique's MTR01 product. ABV came very close to the 16% advertised.

    I see Anchor also do a Brewer's Yeast, but have not seen it in the shops. Would be interested in trying that out next time, if I can find some.
    Slainte Mhaith!!

    Comment


    • #3
      I try to not go over 10% ABV actually in the washes, but I think I miss-weighed something somewhere, and I ended up with a wash that'll finish closer to 11.5% ABV when it's done. Most of my washes are done at 9% ABV (better quality, yeast isn't stressed), so we'll see how this one comes out.

      By the way, a fermenting rum wash with molasses smells amazing. There's nothing I've ever fermented that comes even remotely close!

      My wash is just molasses, sugar, some killed yeast from a previous batch, yeast nutrients (Fermaid-O because I have it) and some potassium hydroxide to keep the pH from going too acidic. It seems to have worked well, I'll use it again.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Toxxyc View Post
        Rum. That sweet goodness that's made from the simplest of ingredients - molasses and sugar. I currently have 7 litres of low wines, probably at around 40% ABV, and have a 50 litre wash that's finishing up fermenting now. I used a blend of molasses and brown sugar, and pitched in some yeast nutrients followed by two packets of NCP High Foaming Brewing Yeast, that cheap-ass yellow packet.

        That yeast really impressed me. I pitched the lot on Wednesday last week, and when I took a reading yesterday it already ate through most of the sugar. I started the wash at 1.114 OG, and it was down to 1.032 yesterday afternoon. I'll be distilling the lot tomorrow, probably. I'll also be buying a bulk box of that yeast from Makro. Cheap as chips, and now I know it can do at LEAST 10% ABV.
        I havent had the greatest success with that yeast, I used it for my seltzer experiments and it took almost 2 weeks to go from 1.065 to 1.020 at which point it stalled completely.
        It might have been from the type of wash I made though and not enough yeast nutrients.

        Comment


        • #5
          Yeah you need nutrients. Lots of it. What I usually do is I save a large part of the yeast cake from a previous batch and boil that with the water used to dilute all the sugars. Without nutrients, the yeast will not ferment and it will stall.

          Also, heat. I've got my 50l keg wrapped in an electric blanket on full blast. That wash is kept WARM, probably close to 35C for the whole duration of the ferment.

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          • #6
            OK so my rum wash went from 1.112 all the way down to 1.018 with that NCP Superbrew yeast. Definitely getting that yeast again. Smell on the wash was fantastic, and the portion I stripped produced 8 litres of low wines yesterday. I stored around 10 litres of the wash on the side that I'm going to be running with the low wines in the spirit run in an attempt to boost the molasses flavour in the final product.

            So far, so good. Tomorrow I'm doing the spirit run on 15 litres of low wines and 10 litres of wash. I'll have to see how it fills up the kettle and if I don't have to dilute it a bit with water to prevent the element from getting exposed during the run. I'm expecting to retrieve around 5 to 7 litres of hearts. Can't wait!

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            • #7
              Alrighty, I'm currently deep in the hearts of this rum of mine. I'm running the still really slowly to get really good stuff out of it, and it's paying off. The current product is rich, sweet, damn strong and flavourful, almost a tad creamy. I took the liberty of mixing a teaspoon full with a bit of coke in a small glass... Oh my. I'll pay good money for this stuff in the store, just as it is right now. It's AMAZING. Can't wait to get this on oak and spice!

              Comment


              • #8
                Too bad you're in Pretoria, or I might have paid good money for a bottle, if it's that good!!

                I found that cooling my rum tester down with a small piece of ice takes the edge off it and allows for a better tasting of the notes behind the alcohol, but that's me.


                Originally posted by Toxxyc View Post
                Alrighty, I'm currently deep in the hearts of this rum of mine. I'm running the still really slowly to get really good stuff out of it, and it's paying off. The current product is rich, sweet, damn strong and flavourful, almost a tad creamy. I took the liberty of mixing a teaspoon full with a bit of coke in a small glass... Oh my. I'll pay good money for this stuff in the store, just as it is right now. It's AMAZING. Can't wait to get this on oak and spice!
                Slainte Mhaith!!

                Comment


                • #9
                  If you have to cool it down with ice, you're perhaps not making the correct cuts, or you're running your wash at too high an ABV. You can also get rid of that bite with a bit of glycerine, if you so wish. I'm planning on testing this rum with a bit of glycerine to see what it does, as I've never used it in larger volumes before.

                  The still is still producing, and I'm slowly starting to run out of containers to store cuts in right now. Hoping to get all the alcohol out, but also hoping it stops soon, haha.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I agree with the glycerine as I use that in my rum too, but for tasting (regardless of what alcohol I am tasting for the first time) I always take just a little bit, add a tiny piece of ice and taste. It is a trick I was shown by the distillery master at Tomintoul a few years ago. The test was to try some with, and without, ice and see the difference. It can be quite remarkable.
                    Slainte Mhaith!!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      there we go
                      The Problem With The World Is That Everyone Is A Few Drinks Behind.!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Yeah I get watering it down as a taster upfront. I do the same with my whiskies I distill. Watered down to around 25% ABV actually. Really shows flavour that you miss at full proof.

                        I water down with RO drinking water, and not ice cubes though. Should do the same with this rum. Tasting it the whole time at 70% ABV and up can be...interesting.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          OK so I ended up oaking at 70% ABV instead of the 60% ABV I wanted to. I read up and it seems that more people are oaking their rums at a higher proof. I'm not sure why, but if it works for them, it should work for me. So I opted not to water it down after blending and got just over 6 litres at 70% ABV on the dot. I added:

                          90 grams of American Oak, virgin, Medium toast stave (store bought)
                          2 x chunks of French Oak, virgin, heavily charred (home charred)
                          A light sprinkle (probably 10 grams) of American Oak, ex-bourbon cask chips

                          The idea is to get sweetness into this rum ASAP. All the wood in there should provide sweet, full, rich flavour, and both the virgin stave and charred french oak in there right now will be used for a future whisky that I just can't wait to use.

                          When the time comes to bottle for the competition I'm just going to pull the oak and then add, for the entire batch:

                          25ml Glycerine
                          10 Allspice berries
                          1/2 teaspoon aniseed
                          4 whole cloves
                          1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
                          A few slivers of orange peel, just the outer peel without the pith, to taste
                          Treacle #3 molasses to taste
                          Bourbon Vanilla extract to taste

                          And then it'll be watered down to 43% and bottled. Got the bottles already, and the labels are still a work in progress. After pulling everything and running it through a filter, I should end up with around 12 bottles, ready to drink, with a bit spare. Can't WAIT!

                          - - - Updated - - -

                          And some pictures, after just 24 hours on the oak:


                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Packed the kettle with some dunder and poured in 5kgs of Treacle #3 molasses last night. Tomorrow I'll mix in the sugar and then it's up to the yeast to finish up this next batch of rum!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Toxxyc View Post
                              OK so I ended up oaking at 70% ABV instead of the 60% ABV I wanted to. I read up and it seems that more people are oaking their rums at a higher proof. I'm not sure why, but if it works for them, it should work for me. So I opted not to water it down after blending and got just over 6 litres at 70% ABV on the dot. I added:

                              90 grams of American Oak, virgin, Medium toast stave (store bought)
                              2 x chunks of French Oak, virgin, heavily charred (home charred)
                              A light sprinkle (probably 10 grams) of American Oak, ex-bourbon cask chips

                              The idea is to get sweetness into this rum ASAP. All the wood in there should provide sweet, full, rich flavour, and both the virgin stave and charred french oak in there right now will be used for a future whisky that I just can't wait to use.

                              When the time comes to bottle for the competition I'm just going to pull the oak and then add, for the entire batch:

                              25ml Glycerine
                              10 Allspice berries
                              1/2 teaspoon aniseed
                              4 whole cloves
                              1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
                              A few slivers of orange peel, just the outer peel without the pith, to taste
                              Treacle #3 molasses to taste
                              Bourbon Vanilla extract to taste

                              And then it'll be watered down to 43% and bottled. Got the bottles already, and the labels are still a work in progress. After pulling everything and running it through a filter, I should end up with around 12 bottles, ready to drink, with a bit spare. Can't WAIT!

                              - - - Updated - - -

                              And some pictures, after just 24 hours on the oak:


                              What size is this glass jar/container? What does that plastic do in strong spirits?

                              I go a 7L and was thinking of closing the tap hole with the seals that came with the container and ss bolt, nut and washers. Would make a nice container for aging I think

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